Genesis Chapter 5

So Seth, Eve’s son who essentially replaced Abel, seems to be the true inheritor of Adam’s legacy. Seth is first described as “in his [Adam’s] own likeness, in his image.” This, of course, parallels Adam’s relationship to God, making Seth the most God-like of Adam’s sons. This cyclical relationship—and the whole chapter—reinforces the theme of lineage and paternalism, and that passing on one’s likeness is of critical importance. Otherwise, you break the seemingly-infinite chain that eventually leads back to God. So yeah, it’s not just a cliché: according to the Bible, we are all literally children of God (if you go back far enough).

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Genesis Chapter 4

This chapter includes another classic story: Cain and Abel. Cain’s story not only parallels his own parents’ casting out of Eden, but begins the solidification of God’s teachings, besides “do what I say or else.” At the same time, though, this chapter introduces how God’s teachings could be manipulated to serve one’s own selfish interests—a warning, perhaps.

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Genesis Chapter 3

So I’m only three chapters in and I’m already mad at this book. That didn’t take long.

As one of the most famous chapters in the Bible—Adam and Eve eat fruit from tree of knowledge and get cast out of Eden—I know I have more biases and prior knowledge here than other chapters. But in looking closely at the text itself, rather than a fable-ized version, I found both surprises and interesting parallels.

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Genesis Chapter 1

This first chapter oversees the creation of many binaries—heaven and earth, light and darkness, morning and evening, moon and sun, etc. There is an overarching sense of progressive division—one becomes two. Even so, with the creation of division comes the creation of binaries, and we all know the problem with binaries. (They are sometimes arbitrary, and one side always ends up being the “better” one.)

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